2009 Pontiac G6

    (3 Reviews)




    MSRP
    $21,165
    Advertisement

    2009 Pontiac G6 Expert Review:New Car Test Drive

    Fresh styling, improved gas mileage.

    Introduction

    The 2009.5 Pontiac G6 brings a fresh appearance some nice engineering upgrades to this sporty lineup of midsize sedans, coupes and convertibles. 

    A mid-year freshening gives these late-2009 models a sharper look up front, more like that of the top-level GXP. And the four-cylinder is now offered with an optional six-speed automatic transmission that delivers EPA-estimated fuel economy of 22 mpg in the city and 33 on the highway. 

    We've found these cars enjoyable to drive and quite pleasant. The G6 two-door coupe is sleek and sporty, the convertible features a dramatic folding hardtop, and the sedan is an attractive alternative to other midsize sedans. Most come with V6 engines, though the sedan is available with a four-cylinder engine. 

    For 2009, XM Satellite Radio is now standard on all models. And several new option packages, which according to Pontiac were inspired by consumer demand, make it easier to upgrade and personalize the G6. As before OnStar, side airbags and anti-lock brakes are standard equipment on all G6's. 

    We've found the G6 GT and GXP models to have good road manners, even when driven hard, thanks to their long wheelbase and European-designed architecture. This is based on test drives of the G6 GT sedan, GT Convertible, and GXP coupe. 

    The price point makes the Pontiac G6 a popular choice as a mid-size sedan and we've found it roomy and plush with excellent overall function. The coupe is comfortable and sporty. And for a real open-top experience, the convertible features one of the longest retractable hardtop roofs in production. 

    The G6 offers some interesting features. It can be started remotely from the comfort of your home by pressing a button on the key fob, a luxury on bitter cold winter mornings or sweltering summer afternoons. The G6 was designed to offer a strong value among midsize cars, and we think it's an alternative worth considering. 

    Lineup

    The G6 sedan ($21,165) comes standard with a 164-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine mated to a four-speed automatic transmission. Standard features also include air conditioning; tilt/telescopic steering wheel; power windows, door locks, and mirrors; AM/FM/CD stereo with auxiliary input jack; XM Satellite Radio hardware; OnStar; and 17-inch five-spoke wheels with 225/50R17 tires. The Preferred Package ($370) adds cruise control; remote vehicle starting; leather-wrapped steering wheel, brake handle, and shift knob; and steering wheel audio controls. A Special Value package deletes some equipment and drops the tire size to 215/55R17 for a credit ($1,890). 

    New for 2009 are two Sport Packages for the base model. Sport Package 1 ($1,245) upgrades to a six-speed automatic transmission for improved performance and economy, and also adds TAPshift transmission controls on the steering wheel, a rear spoiler, and StabiliTrak electronic stability control. Sport Package 2 ($1,495) includes a 221-horsepower 3.5-liter V6, four-speed automatic transmission, 17-inch painted aluminum wheels, fog lamps, and a rear spoiler. Also, the power steering assist switches from lightweight electric to heavy-duty hydraulic. 

    Expanded for 2009 is the Sun and Sound Package ($1,235), which now comes with lighted visor mirrors and an electrochromic inside rearview mirror with compass, as well as a six-disc CD changer and power sunroof. 

    The GT sedan ($24,710), GT coupe ($24,610), and GT convertible ($32,300) make the Preferred Package and Sport Package 2 standard (including, of course, the 3.5-liter V6); and add a 200-watt Monsoon premium sound system. Additionally, the convertible comes with 18-inch machined-face wheels. A Sport Package just for the convertible ($1,290-1,490) upgrades to a 222-horsepower, higher-torque 3.9-liter V-6, chrome-tipped exhaust outlets, 18-inch ChromeTech wheels, automatic air conditioning, and a six-way power driver seat. 

    The GXP sedan ($29,060) and GXP coupe ($28,960) feature a 3.6-liter V6 providing 252 horsepower, driving through a six-speed automatic transmission. Backing that up are a sport-tuned suspension, StabiliTrak, 18-inch ChromeTech wheels, unique front and rear fascias, dual chrome exhaust tips, and a leather interior. 

    The Sun and Sound Plus Packages for GT ($1,535) and GXP ($1,125) include not only the sunroof and six-disc CD changer but also 17-inch ChromeTech wheels for the GT, or 18-inch Black ChromeTech wheels on GXP. The Street Edition for the GXP ($990) adds hood scoops and a hammerhead spoiler. 

    Other options include a six-way power driver's seat ($200) for the base and GT models, an engine-block heater ($75), and various appearance items. A Premium Package ($1,195) for base and GT adds heated leather-appointed front bucket seats and six-way power adjustment for the driver's seat. All models offer the new MyLink Package ($250-395), which bundles one year of OnStar Directions & Connections, a full year of XM Satellite Radio (rather than the standard 3-month trial), a USB port, and Bluetooth phone connectivity. Safety features that come on all models include driver and passenger frontal and side-impact airbags, ABS with traction control, and LATCH child-seat attachments. All models except the convertible come with side curtain airbags as well. Outboard front seat belts have pretensioners and load limiters. OnStar 8.0 is standard on all models, an excellent safety feature thanks to its ability to summon help. 

    Walkaround

    The Pontiac G6 models are attractive cars. They have the smooth styling of the latest-generation Pontiacs, sharing cues with the Solstice roadster and other models and sort of a Lexus/Toyota look from the rear. The G6 offers clean, uncluttered lines that are quite pleasing. 

    For 2009, base and GT models got new front fascias. The traditional Pontiac twin upper grille nostrils are now larger, with sharper corners. The broad lower grille with its narrow center divider is gone completely, replaced by a large trapezoidal opening in the center, flanked by a pair of oblong scoops that sweep up at their outboard edges. All three openings are defined by a box-section welt that rises from under the center opening and flows out over the side openings, suggesting the pointy end of a Texas longhorn (or the front bumper of a Tucker, if you remember back that far). In all, the look is sharper, more aggressive than before, and more like that of the high-performance GXP (which remains unchanged). 

    Additional new creases in the sedan's rear bumper provide more definition, while echoing the new look up front. The coupe and convertible remain unchanged at the rear. 

    Base and GT buyers can choose a clean-flanked look, or an optional ($100) body-color spear running the length of the doors. Deck-lid spoiler options range from none to a nicely integrated raised lip to the aptly named hammerhead, whose (theoretically functional) side pods resemble the face of its deep-sea namesake. 

    The restyled GT and unchanged GXP now look more alike than before, although the GXP retains its unique front fascia, with more vertical upper nostrils filled with a grille texture that resembles braided stainless steel. The three lower openings are similar in shape to those on the new base and GT, but without the steer-horn molding, and all three are smaller, leaving room for the more prominent upper grille and for separate round foglight nacelles at the sides. The center opening is black while the side openings share the braided-stainless theme. 

    The coupe and convertible inject more excitement into the styling. The frameless windows are indexed, meaning that they automatically open 0.25 inch when the doors are opened, and close again when the door is closed for a tight seal. From the rear, the coupe and convertible feature narrow taillights and a sloping decklid. 

    The Pontiac G6 is built in Michigan, from parts and ideas used on the Saab 9-3, Opel Vectra, and Chevrolet Malibu. 

    Interior

    The Pontiac G6 has a nice interior with attractive fabrics and comfortable bucket seats. At first, it has that tank-like Pontiac feeling of sitting down low in the cockpit, but that feeling goes away in time, and the G6 becomes a happy, comfortable companion. The cabin is altogether different from the old soft-plastic, fat-knob theme of older Pontiacs. It's much more modern, more European. 

    The sporty front bucket seats are made for body comfort and support in handling maneuvers. We found them very comfortable thanks to thick padding and sufficient bolsters. 

    Rear-seat space benefits from the relatively long wheelbase of 112.3 inches. In the sedan, a 6-foot, 4-inch passenger can sit behind a 6-foot, 4-inch driver with plenty of room. The coupe's rear seating is a little tighter, and the convertible's tighter still, especially in the shoulder and hip room categories. The rear bucket seats in the G6 convertible are appropriate because three people don't fit well anyway. 

    The dash is done in four major sections including a stark, un-grained plastic center stack that holds two vents, the sound system, heater controls, and a 12-volt power outlet. Instruments and controls are presented in white on black (illuminated in red at night). Every single knob and escutcheon has a chrome ring around it; very tasteful, and nicely presented, with small, conservative graphics on the faces and labels. 

    The center stack has a red-LED readout and control panel that makes it easy to use the sound system's features, as well as to customize the locking, lighting, and other functions. The trip computer and driver information system are likewise intuitive and enjoyable to use. 

    The audio system works well and the knobs are sized well for operating while driving, a welcome relief from the tiny buttons and knobs on many systems. However, we miss the smart pre-set buttons used on previous GM vehicles that let the driver switch from favorite AM, FM, and XM stations simply by pressing the pre-set; the new setup works like most radios, requiring the driver first change the band before switching to the favored station. 

    The remote starting system allows the driver to start the car from the warmth of the house on cold winter mornings, a welcome feature when needed. 

    The convertible's top was engineered with Karmann and the big top opens and closes within 30 seconds, storing under the truck lid and a hard tonneau cover. We found it works exceptionally well, powering up or down quietly and quickly, with the press of a button. Hold the button down after it's done and the windows will power up or down appropriately. 

    The convertible's trunk is accessible when the top is down, but space is reduced from tiny (12.6 cubic feet) to grocery-bag sized (5.8 cubic feet). Obviously, that can limit your use of the convertible's top-down mode on long trips. The coupe offers 12 cubic feet of trunk space that's there all the time, while the sedan offers 14 cubic feet. 

    The trunk lid on the convertible was heavy and relatively hard to lift open. 

    Driving Impression

    The Pontiac G6 GT is fun to drive and quite pleasant for cruising around. We found the sedan, coupe and convertible models reasonably quiet, though a little noise from the powertrain and some road noise slipped in here and there, and there was some wind noise from the sharp-edged mirror bodies. 

    Handling is responsive and fun. The GT suspension strikes a good balance between handling and ride quality. The ride is comfortable and smooth and the car tracks well. The base model's electric power steering is nicely weighted in terms of effort at the steering wheel rim, but a little vague in fast transitions. 

    The EcoTec four-cylinder engine is from the same double overhead-cam engine family used in the Saab 9-3, Opel Vectra and Chevrolet Malibu. The 2.4-liter four is rated 164 horsepower, with 156 pound-feet of torque. With the standard four-speed automatic transmission, this combination is EPA-rated at 22 mpg city/30 mpg highway. But opt for Sport Package 1 with the six-speed automatic, and the highway rating jumps 10 percent, to 33 mpg, while the city rating remains the same. Mostly this is because the six-speed comes with a significantly taller final drive ratio (2.89:1, vs. 3.91 with the four-speed), which means the engine can loaf at lower rpm in high gear. By itself, the numerically lower final drive would compromise acceleration; but the two additional low gears in the six-speed box should compensate for the high gear at the top, resulting in no net loss of performance. 

    Both automatic transmissions work flawlessly. The four-speed automatic is matched well to the engine's power and torque bands. The six-speed works better. Most of the time, we simply put it in Drive and drove. However, the six-speed features a simple manual-control mechanism that allows the driver to shift manually. When the manual mode is selected, it will not automatically upshift for you at redline but will go right up against the rev limiter, a strategy many enthusiasts prefer. An indicator light in the instrument panel helps remind you to shift. 

    The popular 3.5-liter V6 is quiet and smooth, producing 221 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque. GM has refined this overhead-valve engine, and even updated it with continuously variable valve timing. It's relatively smooth and quiet, with decent fuel economy: 17/26 mpg city/highway in the G6 GT. The more powerful 3.6-liter engine that comes in the GXP is a modern, all-aluminum dual overhead-cam unit with four valves per cylinder. It also features variable-valve timing, and is rated at 252 hp and 251 pound-feet of torque, with fuel economy identical to the less-powerful 3.5. 

    Optional for the GT convertible only is a 3.9-liter V6. Like the 3.5, this is an older-style two-valve-per-cylinder pushrod unit updated with variable valve timing. It's rated only 222 horsepower, for all practical purposes the same as the 3.5; but with about 8 percent more torque (238 pound feet) it should deliver somewhat snappier acceleration. 

    We did a number of 90-0 mph ABS panic stops in a G6 GT on a deserted country road, and it stopped straight and true every time with no fade. The brakes have a nice, progressive power application through the pedal. 

    Summary

    The Pontiac G6 is a roomy car that offers good road manners and excellent overall function, especially at initial prices. With sedans, coupes, convertibles, high-performance models, and a low-price leader all available, buyers should be able to find a G6 that suits their lifestyle. 

    NewCarTestDrive.com correspondent Jim McCraw reported on the sedan from Detroit, with Mitch McCullough reporting on the coupe and convertible from Los Angeles, and John F. Katz reporting on new engine/transmission combinations from South Central Pennsylvania. 

    Model Lineup

    Pontiac G6 sedan ($21,165); Special Value sedan ($19,275); GT sedan ($24,710); GT coupe ($24,610); GT convertible ($32,300); GXP sedan ($29,060); GXP coupe ($28,960). 

    Assembled In

    Orion Township, Michigan. 

    Options As Tested

    Sun & Sound Plus package ($1,535) includes power sunroof, 6-CD changer, 17-inch ChromeTech wheels. 

    Model Tested

    Pontiac G6 GT sedan ($24,710). 

    We're sorry, we do not have the specific review that you requested. Please check back as we are continuously updating our review selections.

    *The data and content on this web site is subject to change without notice. Neither AOL nor any of its data or content providers shall be liable for errors in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

    Powered by

    More on the G6

    Whether you're a buyer or owner of the 2009 Pontiac G6 we've got you covered.

    FIND A GREAT USED CAR

    GO
    Powered by
    Get a free CARFAX record check for a used car

    Great Auto Loan Rates

    Low Rates on New and Used Autos

    Powered By Apply In One Easy Step »
    Read 2009 Pontiac G6 SE 4dr Sedan reviews from auto industry experts to gain insight on the Pontiac G6's drivability, comfort, power and performance.
    Best Deal:
    Our Price:
    Savings:
    MSRP:
    Go Back to Best Deals »