VICTORVILLE, Calif. (AP) - Authorities say the classic Chevrolet convertible featured in the film "Pulp Fiction" has been found nearly two decades after it was stolen.

The San Bernardino County Sun reports movie director Quentin Tarantino's 1964 Chevelle Malibu was recovered in the San Francisco Bay area earlier this week.

John Travolta's character drove the cherry red car in the movie.

Sheriff's Sgt. Albert Anolin said an investigation into an old Malibu in the desert city of Victorville on April 18 led detectives to another Malibu in the Oakland area. They then confirmed that vehicle belonged to Tarantino and was reported stolen in 1994.

Authorities say the car's current owner is not believed to be involved in its theft and is considered to be a victim of a fraud.

A message seeking Tarantino's comment was not immediately returned.

Preventing car theft

With the summer holidays coming up -- a time when thieves are especially active -- take a moment and check out these car theft deterrents. Although some may seem pretty obvious, they can go a long way in making sure your vehicle stays in the right hands.

Park in plain sight

Our natural inclination is to hide something we don't want anyone to steal, but for cars, visibility is the key to safety, say experts. Thieves prefer to work out of sight of people and electronic recording devices, so leave your car in a well-lit, populated area. Take your keys---always

If you think this tip falls into the "duh" section of car theft prevention, try Googling the phrase "keys in ignition" or similar and you'll see many trusting souls leave the equivalent of a sign reading "FREE CAR!" hanging from their ignition switches on a daily basis. Car theft is often a crime of opportunity, so shut yours off and pocket your keys even if you're only ducking into a convenience store.

Don't hide your keys anywhere within or outside the car

You know those magnetic key holders you can buy to store your spare key? Leave it in your house on the fridge, not under bumpers, in the glove compartment or anywhere in the car. Thieves know all the hiding places you do, and probably a few more.

Use a variety of methods to slow would-be thieves

Car alarms are ubiquitous and often go ignored. When used in tandem with other theft prevention methods, though, they will make a thief naturally try to work faster, and if he comes across other security measures, he may give up altogether and move on. Apply the emergency brake, turn your wheels hard left or right and set the car in "park" or in gear, making it more difficult for you to be quickly towed, and consider using a vehicle recovery system like LoJack or an engine immobilizer device such as Ravelco.

Disable your battery if parking long-term

A thief won't spend time trying to diagnose an apparent engine problem. Consider yanking one of the cable wires to your battery if you're leaving your car parked at an airport or anywhere else where it will sit unattended for more than a few days.

Sign valuable parts

Take the time to embed your Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the inside of your trunk, inside your doors, on your sound system components and any other pricey parts thieves like to chop. If you don't feel like doing it yourself, contact your local police precinct or even your insurance company, some of whom offer free VIN etchings.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.