A new study on bad driving behavior from Insurance.com investigated how we react when we engage in road rage and found that women and men react differently.

Women were found to be more likely to swear or flip fellow drivers then their male counterparts. Men are no angels though: They were twice as likely as women to key a car or flash their high beams at offending drivers.

Leon James, a psychology professor at the University of Hawaii, told Insurance.com drivers are more likely to display aggressive behavior in the car rather than in everyday interactions because drivers feel protected and faceless while driving. Driving is also seen as a competitive activity, raising aggression in both men and women.

A thousand people, equally split between men and women with children 12 years or younger, were asked about their bad driving habits and whether they regret their more extreme actions.

The good news is three-fourths of those polled regretted their road rage, or at least certain aspects of it. A full 75 percent felt bad after swearing in front of their children while driving. Dinging someone's car in a parking lot and driving away was the next most regretted faux pas at 62 percent. Only 34 percent, however, felt remorse for doling outs brake-checks to tailgaters.